The Granary District

Creating walkable, urban, human-centered neighborhoods in the Granary District.

Something to think about since this is a large part of the Granary target "audience"

 

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865556455/Millennials-love-to-sp...

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Interesting article Pete. I think there is definitely a shift in priorities in the millennial generation, of which, I am a part. This article highlights some of the problems with it but I also think there are many positive and lateral changes in priorities. Sure, we love our gadgets, and many of us are in debt, but cars are becoming less of a priority, and James touched on spending more time in the public sphere as being another positive change. I think many of us want less of the dubious responsibilities associated with a single family home living arrangement and are willing to pay for it. With time I think our debts will be paid and we will live this lifestyle with more ease. I remember friends talking about their time in Gothenburg, Sweden where our generation would live in rat-hole apartments just to be near the heart of town and have enough to spend on designer clothes. What are your thoughts?

It may suggest that there be more emphasis on rentals as opposed to owner occupied units and 3 - 4 bedroom "suite" units with a corresponding number of toilet/bath/shower rooms to maximize room-mates

Very good point.

I definitely agree, but I also think theres a disconnect in what the real estate and housing word is offering at the moment and what folks my age want. So I think that in the long run, if new and different options from the standard single family home are offered that more may be willing to save and buy. Offering new and contemporary designs, innovative space layouts. Amenities that make us "Y'ers" excited about buying.

Which is exactly why were here right. At least, its part of why I am here.

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